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Hip

Hip Anatomy

The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint.

Any injury or disease of the hip will adversely affect the joint's range of motion and ability to bear weight.

The hip joint is made up of the following:

  • Bones and joints
  • Ligaments of the joint capsule
  • Muscles and tendons
  • Nerves and blood vessels that supply the bones and muscles of the hip

Hip Conditions

  • hip injury Hip Injury

    The hip joint is prone to several types of injuries. Common ones include fractures, dislocations, labral tears, bursitis and snapping hip syndrome. Hip injuries may be caused due to accidents, falls or congenital deformities.

  • hip pain Hip Pain

    Hip pain, one of the common complaints, may not always be felt precisely over the hip joint rather in and around the hip joint. The cause for pain is multifactorial and the exact position of your hip pain suggests the probable cause or underlying condition causing it.

  • Femoroacetabular Impingment Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition characterized by excessive friction in the hip joint from the presence of bony irregularities. These cause pain and decreased range of hip motion.

  • hip Fracture Hip Fracture

    Hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thighbone.

  • hip Dislocation Hip Dislocation

    Hip dislocation occurs when the head of the femur also called thighbone moves out of the socket. The femoral head can dislocate either backward (posterior dislocation) or forward (anterior dislocation). Hip dislocation can be caused by injuries from motor vehicle accidents or severe falls.

  • Laberal Tear Hip Labral Tear

    A hip labral tear is an injury to the labrum, the cartilage that surrounds the outside rim of your hip joint socket.

  • hip Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in the elderly. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint called cartilage.

  • Groin INjuries Groin Injuries in Athletes

    Groin injuries are injuries sustained by athletes during sports activity. Groin injuries comprise about 2 to 5 percent of all sports injuries. The most common kind of groin injury is a groin strain or a pulled groin muscle.

  • hamstring injury Hamstring Injuries

    The hamstring is a group of three muscles that run along the back of the thigh from the hip to the knee. Hamstring injuries occur when these muscles are strained or pulled. They are common in dancers and athletes of all sorts including runners and those who play football, soccer, basketball, tennis, etc.

Hip Procedures

  • hip Preservation surgery Hip Preservation Surgery

    Hip reconstruction is a surgery to repair or replace a damaged hip joint that causes pain and limits your movement.

  • hip Labral Repair Hip Labral Repair

    Hip labral repair is a surgery for the treatment of hip labral tears. Labral tears may be caused by trauma, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), hip hypermobility, dysplasia, and degeneration. It is common in athletes playing sports such as ice hockey, soccer, golf and ballet.

  • hip Arthoscopy Hip Arthroscopy

    Hip arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into your hip joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

  • hip Reconstruction Hip Reconstruction

    Hip reconstruction is a surgery to repair or replace a damaged hip joint that causes pain and limits your movement.

Affiliated Locations

  • Joliet

    951 Essington Road Joliet, IL 60435

    Tel : (815) 744-4551 | Fax : (815) 744-4756

  • New Lenox

    1870 Silver Cross Boulevard Pavilion B, Suite 200 New Lenox, IL 60451

    Tel : (815) 462-3474 | Fax : (815) 462-1032